History of Bhedaghat

Bhedaghat is a town and a nagar panchayat in Jabalpur district in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. It is situated by the side of river Narmada and is approximately 20 km from Jabalpur city. It’s most famous sights are the Duandhar Falls, Marble Rocks, and the Chausath Yogini temple.

The temple is one of the four major extant temples containing carvings of sixty four yogini, female yoga mystics. It was built in the 10th century under the Kalachuri Empire. It commands a view of the whole area around and of the river flowing through the marble rocks.

Bhedaghat Madhya Pradesh

As of 2001 India census, Bhedaghat had a population of 1840. Males constitute 53% of the population and females 47%. Bhedaghat has an average literacy rate of 63%, higher than the national average of 59.5%; with male literacy of 71% and female literacy of 53%. 16% of the population is under 7 years of age.

Soaring in glittering splendor, the Marble Rocks at Bhedaghat rise to a hundred feet on either side of the Narmada. The serene loveliness of the scene is one of cool quiet, the sunlight sparkling on the marble-white pinnacles and casting dappled shadows on the pellucid waters. These white rocks with views of black and dark green volcanic seams are truly majestic, and produce a magical effect on moonlit nights

The holy river flows by tranquilly flanked by the towering cliffs which reflect in it like a mirror the changing moods of nature. A little distance away, it becomes turbulent as it plunges in a mighty water fall known as Dhuandhar. In his Highlands of Central India Captain J. Forsyth speaks eloquently about the infinitely varied beauty of the rocks:

"the eye never wearies of the . . . effect produced by the broken and reflected sunlight, now glancing from a pinnacle of snow-white marble reared against the deep blue of the sky as from a point of silver, touching here and there with bright lights the prominence of the middle heights and again losing itself in the soft bluish grays of their recesses. . . Here and there the white saccharine limestone is seamed by veins of dark green or black volcanic rock; a contrast which only enhances like a setting of jet, the purity of the surrounding marble."